Why Kids Should Work

December 4, 2019

Most parents try to teach kids the life skills they’ll need to thrive as adults. Some of those skills relate to money and work ethic. Sadly, particularly in affluent communities, children are often sheltered from the responsibilities and realities faced by adults. The percentage of high school-aged kids who work is at an all-time low, declining to 20% in 2013 from 45% in 1998. Read more

Looming College Deadlines

October 2, 2019

I’m currently taking a class on college planning, so this topic is top of mind. Additionally, the fall is the time high school seniors apply for colleges and financial aid. As such, it seems a good time to remind people of the various types of deadlines to stay on top of this time of year. Read more

Are College Admissions Stacked Against Us?

April 2, 2019

Going to college is a rite of passage for many Americans. For many young adults, it’s the first time they live away from their families and take responsibility for their lives. Due to years of above-average price inflation, college has gotten to the point of being unaffordable for many or at least a significant financial commitment. And now we’ve learned that the admissions process at many elite universities has been gamed by wealthy families, further exacerbating the inequality involved in getting a college education. 

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Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be

May 5, 2018

I recently read a book, Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be by Frank Bruni, that shed some light on the college admissions hysteria many families find themselves immersed in, particularly those who live in affluent communities. Over the past decade, college admissions rates have plummeted, with some of the elite schools now boasting rates in the 5% range, yet families have become ever more focused on obtaining admission to a small list of these elite schools.  Read more

Paying for College without Bankrupting the Retirement Plan

May 1, 2017

This time of year, parents of high school seniors may find themselves experiencing dual emotions related to their kids – pride over the top-tier colleges their child has been accepted to and shock over how much it’s going to cost. Another emotion might quickly set in for those who haven’t saved enough for college – panic over how in the world they are going to pay for their child’s dream college. With the average annual all-in cost of a private university now approximately $50,000 and some elite schools in the $70,000 range, many people can’t easily pay for college out of cash flow. What’s the panicked parent to do?

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The Best Student Loan

October 1, 2016

Given the ever-increasing cost of college and that 72% of undergraduates take out student loans to help pay for college, it’s worth understanding the student loan choices.

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